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Abstract Title:

Soft drink consumption is positively associated with increased waist circumference and 10-year incidence of abdominal obesity in Spanish adults.

Abstract Source:

J Nutr. 2015 Feb ;145(2):328-34. Epub 2014 Dec 17. PMID: 25644355

Abstract Author(s):

Anna N Funtikova, Isaac Subirana, Santiago F Gomez, Montserrat Fitó, Roberto Elosua, Alejandra A Benítez-Arciniega, Helmut Schröder

Article Affiliation:

Anna N Funtikova

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The accumulation of abdominal fat increases risk of metabolic disorders and premature death. There is a dearth of prospective data on the association between caloric beverage consumption and surrogate markers of abdominal adiposity.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the relation between consumption of nonalcoholic caloric beverages, including soft drinks, fruit juice, whole milk, and skim and low-fat milk, and changes in waist circumference (WC) and odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity.

METHODS: We conducted a prospective, population-based study of 2181 Spanish men and women aged 25-74 y who were followed from 2000 to 2009. We measured weight, height, and WC, and recorded data on diet and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) with the use of validated questionnaires. We fit multivariable linear and logistic regression models.

RESULTS: A 100 kcal increase in soft drink consumption was associated with a 1.1 cm increase in WC (P = 0.018) after 10 y of follow-up. Substitution of 100 kcal of soft drinks with 100 kcal of whole milk or 100 kcal of juice was associated with a 1.3 cm (95% CI: 0.3, 2.4) and 1.1 cm (95% CI: 0.03, 2.2) decrease in WC, respectively. Increasing consumption of soft drinks from baseline to follow-up led to WC gain compared with maintaining nonconsumption. Greater soft drink consumption was positively associated (P = 0.029) with increased odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity.

CONCLUSION: Adults' consumption of soft drinks was associated with increased WC and odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity. This association was moderate but consistent in all statistical models.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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