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Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in sweat: a systematic review.

Abstract Source:

J Environ Public Health. 2012 ;2012:184745. Epub 2012 Feb 22. PMID: 22505948

Abstract Author(s):

Margaret E Sears, Kathleen J Kerr, Riina I Bray

Article Affiliation:

Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1. megsears@ncf.ca

Abstract:

Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposures are ubiquitous. These toxic elements have no physiological benefits, engendering interest in minimizing body burden. The physiological process of sweating has long been regarded as"cleansing"and of low risk. Reports of toxicant levels in sweat were sought in Medline, Embase, Toxline, Biosis, and AMED as well as reference lists and grey literature, from inception to March 22, 2011. Of 122 records identified, 24 were included in evidence synthesis. Populations, and sweat collection methods and concentrations varied widely. In individuals with higher exposure or body burden, sweat generally exceeded plasma or urine concentrations, and dermal could match or surpass urinary daily excretion. Arsenic dermal excretion was severalfold higher in arsenic-exposed individuals than in unexposed controls. Cadmium was more concentrated in sweat than in blood plasma. Sweat lead was associated with high-molecular-weight molecules, and in an interventional study, levels were higher with endurance compared with intensive exercise. Mercury levels normalized with repeated saunas in a case report. Sweating deserves consideration for toxic element detoxification. Research including appropriately sized trials is needed to establish safe, effective therapeutic protocols.

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Sayer Ji
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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

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