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Abstract Title:

A reduction in DNA damage in neural tissue and peripheral blood of old mice treated with caffeine.

Abstract Source:

J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017 May 19:1-9. Epub 2017 May 19. PMID: 28524728

Abstract Author(s):

Adriani Paganini Damiani, Michelle Lima Garcez, Larissa Letieli de Abreu, Taís Helena Tavares, Carina Rodrigues Boeck, Vanessa Moraes de Andrade

Article Affiliation:

Adriani Paganini Damiani

Abstract:

Studies on caffeine consumption have shown a negative correlation with development of some diseases with subsequent beneficial manifestations. Our aim was to assess the effects of caffeine on peripheral blood and neural tissue DNA in young adult and aged mice. Male Swiss mice (age 2-3 or 16-18 months, respectively) were treated with a caffeine solution (0.3 g/l) for 4 weeks, while controls received water. After the treatments, blood and hippocampal cells (for a comet assay) and femurs (for a micronucleus [MN] test) were collected. The comet assay of peripheral blood and hippocampal cells demonstrated no significant differences between caffeine-treated and control young adult mice in terms of DNA damage index (DI) and frequency. In contrast, when comparing young adult with aged animals, significant differences were observed in DNA damage in blood and hippocampal cells. The differences between aged animals (with or without caffeine) consisted of a significant decrease in DNA DI in the group that received caffeine. In the MN test, an increase in frequency of micronucleated polychromatic (PCE) erythrocytes was noted in aged animals that received water compared to young adult mice. In addition, comparing treated with control aged murine groups, a decrease in frequency of MN was found in PCE erythrocytes of caffeine-treated mice. Chronic caffeine consumption was neither genotoxic nor mutagenic at the dose tested; however, it appears that caffeine actually protected mice from genotoxicity and mutagenicity, consequences attributed to aging.

Study Type : Animal Study

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Sayer Ji
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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

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