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Abstract Title:

The consumption of canned food and beverages and urinary Bisphenol A concentrations in NHANES 2003-2008.

Abstract Source:

Environ Res. 2016 Jun 27 ;150:375-382. Epub 2016 Jun 27. PMID: 27362993

Abstract Author(s):

Jennifer C Hartle, Ana Navas-Acien, Robert S Lawrence

Article Affiliation:

Jennifer C Hartle

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous and includes dietary and environmental pathways. BPA is rapidly glucuronidated in the body, and both BPA and its conjugates can be readily measured in urine.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the contribution of canned food and beverages, known sources of BPA contamination, to BPA biomarkers of exposure using dietary and urinary BPA concentration information in a representative sample of the U.S.

POPULATION:

METHODS: We evaluated 7669 NHANES 2003-2008 participants 6 years and older with 24-h dietary recall information and urinary BPA concentrations available. Using linear regression models, we evaluated the associations between recent canned food and beverage consumption and urinary BPA concentrations, adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS: We found 9% of our participants consumed one canned food in the past 24h and 2% consumed two or more canned foods. The consumption of one canned food vs. none was associated with 24% (95% CI 1.11, 1.38) higher urinary BPA concentrations. The consumption of two or more canned foods vs. none was associated with 54% (95% CI 1.27, 1.88) higher urinary BPA concentrations. The consumption of one or more of some specific types of canned foods vs. none were associated with higher urinary BPA concentrations: 41% (95% CI 1.23, 1.63) higher BPA for vegetable and fruit, 70% (95% CI 1.18, 2.44) higher for canned pasta, and 229% (95% CI 1.22, 4.30) higher for canned soup. Canned beverages were not associated with urinary BPA concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS: Canned food, including some specific types such as canned vegetable and fruit, canned pasta, and canned soup were associated with higher levels of urinary BPA concentrations.

Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Problem Substances : Bisphenol A : CK(685) : AC(178)

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Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

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