Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 250,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Easy Turmeric recipes + The Dark Side of Wheat

n/a
Abstract Title:

Low-dose developmental exposure to bisphenol A induces sex-specific effects in bone of Fischer 344 rat offspring.

Abstract Source:

Environ Res. 2017 Jul 31 ;159:61-68. Epub 2017 Jul 31. PMID: 28772150

Abstract Author(s):

Thomas Lind, Margareta H Lejonklou, Linda Dunder, Annica Rasmusson, Sune Larsson, Håkan Melhus, P Monica Lind

Article Affiliation:

Thomas Lind

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a component of polycarbonate plastics to which humans are regularly exposed at low levels, and an endocrine disruptor with effects on several hormonal systems. Bone is a sensitive hormone target tissue, and we have recently shown that in utero and lactational exposure to 25µg BPA/kg BW/day alters femoral geometry in rat offspring.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate bone effects in rat offspring after developmental exposure to a BPA dose in the range of human daily exposure (0.1-1.5µg/kg BW/day) as well as a dose to corroborate previous findings.

METHODS: Pregnant Fischer 344 rats were exposed to BPA via drinking water corresponding to 0.5µg/kg BW/day: [0.5], (n=21) or 50µg/kg BW/day: [50], (n = 16) from gestational day 3.5 until postnatal day 22, while controls were given only vehicle (n = 25). The offspring was sacrificed at 5 weeks of age. Bone effects were analyzed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), the 3-point bending test, plasma markers of bone turnover, and gene expression in cortical bone and bone marrow.

RESULTS: Compared to controls, male offspring developmentally exposed to BPA had shorter femurs. pQCT analysis revealed effects in the [0.5] group, but not in the [50] group; BPA reduced both trabecular area (-3.9%, p<0.01) and total cross sectional area (-4.1%, p<0.01) of femurs in the [0.5] group, whereas no effects were seen on bone density. Conversely, bone length and size were not affected in female offspring. However, the procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), a peptide formed during type 1 collagen synthesis, was increased in plasma (42%: p<0.01) in female offspring exposed to [0.5] of BPA, although collagen gene expression was not increased in bone. The biomechanical properties of the bones were not altered in either sex. Bone marrow mRNA expression was only affected in male offspring.

CONCLUSIONS: Developmental low-dose exposure to BPA resulted in sex-specific bone effects in rat offspring. A dose approximately eight times lower than the current temporary EFSA human tolerable daily intake of 4µg/kg BW/day, reduced bone length and size in male rat offspring. Long-term studies are needed to clarify whether the increased plasma levels of P1NP in female offspring reflect development of fibrosis.

Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links
Problem Substances : Bisphenol A : CK(685) : AC(178)

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 250,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Easy Turmeric recipes + The Dark Side of Wheat

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2017 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.