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Abstract Title:

Limited uptake, translocation and enhanced metabolic degradation contribute to glyphosate tolerance in Mucuna pruriens var. utilis plants.

Abstract Source:

Phytochemistry. 2012 Jan ;73(1):34-41. Epub 2011 Oct 17. PMID: 22015254

Abstract Author(s):

Antonia María Rojano-Delgado, Hugo Cruz-Hipolito, Rafael De Prado, María Dolores Luque de Castro, Antonio Rodríguez Franco

Article Affiliation:

Departamento de Química Agrícola, Edificio Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Córdoba, E-14071 Córdoba, Spain.

Abstract:

Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens, Fabaceae) plants exhibits an innate, very high resistance (i.e., tolerance) to glyphosate similar to that of plants which have acquired resistance to this herbicide as a trait. We analyzed the uptake of [(14)C]-glyphosate by leaves and its translocation to meristematic tissues, and used scanning electron micrographs to further analyze the cuticle and 3D capillary electrophoresis to investigate a putative metabolism capable of degrading the herbicide. Velvet bean exhibited limited uptake of glyphosate and impaired translocation of the compound to meristematic tissues. Also, for the first time in a higher plant, two concurrent pathways capable of degrading glyphosate to AMPA, Pi, glyoxylate, sarcosine and formaldehyde as end products were identified. Based on the results, the innate tolerance of velvet bean to glyphosate is possibly a result of the combined action of the previous three traits, namely: limited uptake, impaired translocation and enhanced degradation.

Study Type : Plant Study
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Degrading Glyphosate



I am working with a small circle of people in Uruguay, seeking solutions to the problems that impel agricultural producers and cattle ranchers to use glyphosate in the first place.

In addition, we are interested in soil remediation. This article is quite interesting, and we will look forward to seeing how the velvet bean findings might lead to practical applications that shorten the normal half-life of glyphosate.

Meanwhile, do you know of any soil bacteria that have been shown to degrade glyphosate in situ? Many thanks for your excellent work.

--Gary

 

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Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

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Easy Turmeric recipes + The Dark Side of Wheat

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