Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat


Why You Don't See Ads on GreenMedInfo

Did you know that GreenMedInfo.com is is 100% member supported? It is through your membership that we are able to add research content daily, provide thoughtful articles on groundbreaking health & wellness topics, and continue to educate and empower people on the science supporting natural healing.

Our website has always offered open access to our carefully curated research (and always will) but we recently made the decision to become completely advertisement free.

In order for us to continue, we need your support more than ever. Our memberships start at only $8.00 per month and provide you with enhanced content & features.

We appreciate you supporting our mission and sharing our passion!

For more information on becoming a member of GreenMedInfo.com, click here.


Abstract Title:

Use of flax oil to influence honey bee nestmate recognition.

Abstract Source:

J Econ Entomol. 2012 Aug ;105(4):1145-8. PMID: 22928291

Abstract Author(s):

Michael D Breed, Cecily A Lyon, Anna Sutherland, Robert Buchwald

Article Affiliation:

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0334, USA. michael.breed@colorado.edu

Abstract:

Fatty acids, normally found in comb wax, have a strong influence on nestmate recognition in honey bees, Apis mellifera L. Previous work has shown that bees from different colonies, when treated with 16- or 18-carbon fatty acids, such as oleic, linoleic, or linolenic acids, are much less likely to fight than bees from two colonies when only one of the two is treated. Previous work also shows that the influence of comb wax on recognition has practical applications; transfer of empty comb between colonies, before merger of those colonies, reduces fighting among workers within the merged colony. Flax oil contains many of the same fatty acids as beeswax. Here, we tested the hypothesis that treatment of individual bees with flax oil affects nestmate recognition; the results proved to be consistent with this hypothesis and showed that treated bees from different colonies were less likely to fight than untreated bees. These results suggest that flax oil may be useful in facilitating colony mergers.

Study Type : Insect Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2018 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.