Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

Abstract Title:

Induction of labor versus expectant management for post-date pregnancy: is there sufficient evidence for a change in clinical practice?

Abstract Source:

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009 ;88(1):6-17. PMID: 19140042

Abstract Author(s):

Ulla-Britt Wennerholm, Henrik Hagberg, Bengt Brorsson, Christina Bergh

Article Affiliation:

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. ulla-britt.wennerholm@vgregion.se

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To compare perinatal and maternal outcomes between elective induction of labor versus expectant management of pregnancies at 41 weeks and beyond.

DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

METHODS: We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) and PsycINFO (1980 to November, 2007). Inclusion criteria were systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials comparing elective induction of labor versus expectant management of pregnancies at 41 weeks and beyond. Three or more reviewers independently read and evaluated all selected studies. Data were extracted and analyzed using Review Manager Software.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Perinatal mortality.

RESULTS: Thirteen trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. Elective induction of labor was not associated with lower risk of perinatal mortality compared to expectant management (relative risks (RR): 0.33; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.10-1.09). Elective induction was associated with a significantly lower rate of meconium aspiration syndrome (RR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.23-0.79). More women randomized to expectant management were delivered by cesarean section (RR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.96).

CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis illustrated a problem with rare outcomes such as perinatal mortality. No individual study with adequate sample size has been published, nor would a meta-analysis based on the current literature be sufficient. The optimal management of pregnancies at 41 weeks and beyond is thus unknown.

Study Type : Review

Print Options


Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get two FREE E-Books

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.