Abstract Title:

Efficacy and safety of mesalamine suppositories for treatment of ulcerative proctitis in children and adolescents.

Abstract Source:

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2010 Nov;16(11):1931-9. PMID: 20848454

Abstract Author(s):

Melvin B Heyman, Jaroslaw Kierkus, Jean Spénard, Hadia Shbaklo, Monique Giguere

Article Affiliation:

Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0136, USA. mheyman@peds.ucsf.edu


BACKGROUND: Treatment of ulcerative proctitis has not been well studied in pediatric populations. We conducted an open-label trial to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a mesalamine suppository (500 mg) to treat pediatric patients with mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis.

METHODS: Pediatric patients (5-17 years of age) with ulcerative proctitis were enrolled for baseline evaluations, including a flexible sigmoidoscopic (or colonoscopic) assessment with biopsies performed at study entry. Eligible patients were started on mesalamine suppositories (500 mg) at bedtime. Two follow-up visits were scheduled after 3 and 6 weeks of treatment. The dose could be increased to 500 mg twice daily at the week 3 follow-up visit if deemed appropriate by the investigator based on the Disease Activity Index (DAI) assessment. The primary outcome measure was a DAI derived from a composite score of stool frequency, urgency of defecation, rectal bleeding, and general well-being.

RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were included in the intent-to-treat analysis. The mean DAI value decreased from 5.5 at baseline to 1.6 and 1.5 at weeks 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.0001). Only 4 patients had their dose increased to 500 mg twice daily at week 3. Forty-one patients experienced at least one adverse event, most of which were deemed mild and unrelated to study therapy. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were gastrointestinal (n = 30, 61.2%).

CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that a daily bedtime dose of a 500 mg mesalamine suppository is safe and efficacious in children with ulcerative proctitis.

Study Type : Human Study

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