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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

Abstract Title:

Environmental exposure to metals and male reproductive hormones: circulating testosterone is inversely associated with blood molybdenum.

Abstract Source:

Fertil Steril. 2010 Jan;93(1):130-40. Epub 2008 Nov 6. PMID: 18990371

Abstract Author(s):

John D Meeker, Mary G Rossano, Bridget Protas, Vasantha Padmanahban, Michael P Diamond, Elizabeth Puscheck, Douglas Daly, Nigel Paneth, Julia J Wirth

Article Affiliation:

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. meekerj@umich.edu

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To explore associations between exposure to metals and male reproductive hormone levels. DESIGN: Cross-sectional epidemiology study with adjustment for potential confounders. SETTING: University Medical Center. PATIENT(S): Men recruited through two infertility clinics in Michigan. INTERVENTION(S): Metal concentrations and reproductive hormone levels were measured in blood samples collected from 219 men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Serum FSH, LH, inhibin B, T, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. RESULT(S): Cadmium, copper, and lead were all significantly or suggestively positively associated with T when modeled individually, findings that are consistent with limited previous human and animal studies. Conversely, molybdenum was associated with reduced T. A significant inverse trend between molybdenum and T remained when additionally considering other metals in the model, and a positive association between T and zinc was also found. Finally, in exploratory analysis there was evidence for an interaction between molybdenum and zinc, whereby high molybdenum was associated with a 37% reduction in T (relative to the population median level) among men with low zinc. CONCLUSION(S): Although reductions in T and reproductive toxicity after molybdenum exposure have been previously demonstrated in animal studies, more research is needed to determine whether molybdenum poses a risk to human reproductive health.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

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