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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Relationship between depression and chronic periodontitis.

Abstract Source:

J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2015 May-Jun;19(3):294-6. PMID: 26229270

Abstract Author(s):

Shiyamali Sundararajan, Santhanakrishnan Muthukumar, Suresh Ranga Rao

Article Affiliation:

Shiyamali Sundararajan

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a chronic, multifactorial, polymicrobial disease causing inflammation in the supporting structures of the teeth. There is a plethora of nonoral risk factors which can be quoted to aid in the development of chronic periodontitis. According to WHO, depression is a common mental disorder that presents with depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt, disturbed sleep or appetite, low energy and poor concentration. Depression is associated with negligent oral health care and another mechanism proposed disturbance in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis system and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system, which can affect the periodontal status by affecting the immune system.

AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal clinical parameters and depression rating.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study design is a case-control study with 35 patients each in case and control group. The periodontal parameters taken for measurement were probing depth and clinical attachment loss. Depression was calculated using Beck's depression scale.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The statistical analysis was performed by means of SPSS software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA; version 17.0 under windows 2000). Student's t-test was used to determine the relationship between the clinical periodontal parameters and depression.

RESULTS: Self-reported scoring of depression by using Beck's depression inventory has shown that periodontal patients had a significantly higher total depression score than normal controls.

CONCLUSION: This study reveals that there is a direct correlation between the severity of periodontal disease and the severity of depression in patients.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

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