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Abstract Title:

Bisphenol A concentrations in maternal breast milk and infant urine.

Abstract Source:

Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Dec 5. Epub 2012 Dec 5. PMID: 23212895

Abstract Author(s):

K Mendonca, R Hauser, A M Calafat, T E Arbuckle, S M Duty

Article Affiliation:

Nursing Programs, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Science Building, Room 314, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Abstract:

PURPOSE: The present report describes the distribution of breast milk and urinary free and total bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations, from 27 postpartum women and their 31 infants, and explores the influence of age, sex, and nutritional source on infant BPA urinary concentration. METHODS: Both free (unconjugated) and total (free plus conjugated) BPA concentrations from women's breast milk samples and infants' urine samples were measured by online solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests of group comparisons were conducted. RESULTS: Total BPA was detected in 93 % of urine samples in this healthy infant population aged 3-15 months who were without known environmental exposure to BPA [interquartile range (IQR) = 1.2-4.4 μg/L)]. Similarly, 75 % of the mothers' breast milk samples had detectable concentrations of total BPA (IQR = 0.4-1.4 μg/L). Themagnitude and frequency of detection of free BPA in the children's urine and the mothers' breast milk were much lower than the total concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Total BPA was detected in 93 % of this healthy infant population aged 3-15 months who are without known environmental exposure to BPA.Neither free nor total BPA urinary concentrations differed significantly by infant's sex or by nutritional source (breast milk and/or formula) while age group was of borderline significance. There were no significant correlations between free or total BPA concentrations in mothers' breast milk and their infants' urine.

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Sayer Ji
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