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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

Abstract Title:

Cross-sectional study of vitamin D and calcium supplementation effects on chronic periodontitis.

Abstract Source:

J Periodontol. 2009 Sep;80(9):1433-9. PMID: 19722793

Abstract Author(s):

D Douglas Miley, M Nathalia Garcia, Charles F Hildebolt, William D Shannon, Rex A Couture, Catherine L Anderson Spearie, Debra A Dixon, Eric M Langenwalter, Cheryl Mueller, Roberto Civitelli

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: A low dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium hastens bone loss and osteoporosis. Because vitamin D metabolites may also alter the inflammatory response and have antimicrobial effects, we studied whether the use of vitamin D and calcium supplements affects periodontal disease status. METHODS: A cohort of 51 subjects receiving periodontal maintenance therapy was recruited from two dental clinics; 23 were taking vitamin D (>or=400 IU/day) and calcium (>or=1,000 mg/day) supplementation, and 28 were not taking such supplementation. All subjects had at least two interproximal sites with>or=3 mm clinical attachment loss. Daily calcium and vitamin D intake (from food and supplements) were estimated by nutritional analysis. The following clinical parameters of periodontal disease were recorded for the mandibular posterior teeth: gingival index, probing depth, cemento-enamel junction-gingival margin distance (attachment loss), bleeding on probing, and furcation involvement. Posterior photostimulable-phosphor bitewing radiographs were taken to determine cemento-enamel junction-alveolar crest distances (alveolar crest height loss). Data were analyzed with a repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance. RESULTS: Compared to subjects who did not take vitamin D and calcium supplementation, supplement takers had shallower probing depths, fewer bleeding sites, lower gingival index values, fewer furcation involvements, less attachment loss, and less alveolar crest height loss. The repeated-measures analysis indicated that collectively these differences were borderline significant (P = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS: In these subjects receiving periodontal maintenance therapy, there was a trend for better periodontal health with vitamin D and calcium supplementation. More expanded longitudinal studies are required to determine the potential of this relationship.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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Depression: 21st Century Solutions + The Dark Side of Wheat

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