Ignite Your Skin with Spray Tanning?

Ignite Your Skin with Spray Tanning?

We all want a tan, and continuously are looking for a great product to theoretically protect our skin. People slather it on, spraying it, all over the neck, chest, legs, and back. We are told that it is of benefit, and will help us soak in the rays while not harming our skin. We frolic in the sun, and life is good. But, who would have thought that putting it on could create a fire on the body? What??

This happened to a man who was entertaining friends, and after 'protecting himself' simply went to his barbeque grill, before the sunscreen had completely dried. His skin ignited, and he suffered from second degree burns where the sunscreen was applied. This was in May of 2012. There were no labels stating to keep away from flames if the sunscreen wasn't dry...have you ever read that label?   

Since then, several other cases occurred, and the popular brand, has finally announced that it is initiating a voluntary market withdrawal of the popular continuous aerosol spray called, Banana Boat. There are about two-dozen sunscreens that are affected in the recall. This recall is with full knowledge of the US food and Drug Administration. 

Apparently the delivery system and the ingredients take longer to dry on the skin. If a spark comes in contact with a person prior to the complete drying on the skin, the sunscreen can ignite.  

While thinking about this I began to wonder what could be in sunscreen that could ignite?

Some things that have been found in sunscreens, according to researchers at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, are endocrine disruptors, which have been linked with animal cancer growth. Today there are sunscreens with nano-particles, which can be inhaled with unknown consequences.

It is thought that if one is to be in the sun for more than 20 minutes sunscreen might be considered to prevent skin disease such as melanoma.  According to the 2012 Sunscreen Guide released in May of 2012 the chemical oxybenzone is included and despite absorbing the ultraviolet light, may be toxic.  So what to do? For starters, learn about sunscreens, and what is in yours. The skin is your largest organ, and things can be absorbed into your inner world.

Its creepy enough to know that a cell phone ringing at a gas station can cause a fire, but, your suntan spray, igniting on your skin, while believing that you are protecting yourself, is almost too much to absorb.


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Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.