New Research: GMO Food Far Worse Than We Think

GMO Food Far Worse Than We Think

Disturbing new research published in the Journal of Applied Toxicology indicates that genetically modified (GM) crops with "stacked traits" - that is, with multiple traits such as glyphosate-herbicide resistance and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal toxins engineered together into the same plant, are likely to be far more dangerous to human health than previously believed, and all of this is due to their synergistic toxicity.

The natural resistance that most plants have to the chemical glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, has been engineered into many GM plants, so that fields can be sprayed indiscriminately with herbicide without the plants having to worry about destroying the crops. While the GM glyphosate-resistant plants survive, they subsequently contain residues of glyphosate and its various metabolites (e.g. aminomethylphosphonic acid) that present a significant health threat to the public.

In this latest study the glyphosate-containing herbicide Roundup was tested on human embryonic kidney cells at concentrations between 1 to 20,000 parts per million (ppm). It was found that concentrations as low as 50 ppm per million, which the authors noted were "far below agricultural dilutions," induced cell death, with the 50% of the cells dying at 57.5 ppm.

The researchers also found that the insecticidal toxin produced by GM plants known as Cry1Ab was capable of causing cell death at 100 ppm concentrations.

Taken together the authors concluded

"In these results, we argue that modified Bt toxins are not inert on nontarget human cells, and that they can present combined side-effects with other residues of pesticides specific to GM plants."

These disturbing findings follow on the heels of other recent revelations that have discovered that Roundup is toxic by several orders of magnitude more than previously believed. Only 5 days ago (Feb. 14, 2012) the journal Archives of Toxicology reported that Roundup is toxic to human DNA even when diluted to concentrations 450-fold lower than used in agricultural applications.  This effect is likely due to the presence of the surfactant polyoxyethyleneamine within the Roundup formulation which may dramatically enhance the absorption of glyphosate exposure into exposed human cells and tissue.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

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Here's a couple of other factors to investigate



First of all, Glyphosate is chelates soil nutrients to work. It doesn't outright kill them, but starves them to death. The amount of glyphosate that can cause damage is tiny. European scientists demonstrated that less than half an ounce per acre inhibits the ability of plants to take up and transport essential micronutrients (see chart).


As a result, more and more farmers are finding that crops planted in years after Roundup is applied suffer from weakened defenses and increased soil borne diseases. The situation is getting worse for many reasons.

The glyphosate concentration in the soil builds up season after season with each subsequent application. Glyphosate can also accumulate for 6-8 years inside perennial plants like alfalfa, which get sprayed over and over.

Wheat affected after 10 years of glyphosate field applications…

Glyphosate residues in the soil that become bound and immobilized can be reactivated by the application of phosphate fertilizers or through other methods. Potato growers in the West and Midwest, for example, have experienced severe losses from glyphosate that has been reactivated.

Imagine soil that looks like a "Dust Bowl" precursor, regardless of the amount of rain it gets, which is only able to produce stunted crops with very low yields.

 

Nutrient loss in humans and animals…

The same nutrients that glyphosate chelates and deprives plants are also vital for human and animal health. These include iron, zinc, copper, manganese, magnesium, calcium, boron, and others. Deficiencies of these elements in our diets, alone or in combination, are known to interfere with vital enzyme systems and cause a long list of disorders and diseases.

Alzheimer's, for example, is linked with reduced copper and magnesium. This disease has jumped 9000% since 1990.

Manganese, zinc, and copper are also vital for proper functioning of the SOD (superoxide dismutase) cycle. This is key for stemming inflammation and is an important component in detoxifying unwanted chemical compounds in humans and animals.

Glyphosate-induced mineral deficiencies can easily go unidentified and untreated. Even when laboratory tests are done, they can sometimes detect adequate mineral levels, but miss the fact that glyphosate has already rendered them unusable.

The "super weeds" Farmers are now experiencing seem to be pirating the soils nutrition for themselves (Isn't "Mother Nature" a cunning user of adaptation?)as they are growing much larger and faster than previously-as fast as 2-3" per day in some cases.

Put this all together, and if usage continues, we may be looking at a recipe for Global Famine.

 

Thankyou!



Thankyou so much for this extra information!!! :)

Really scary



Really scary

GMO Initiative



Now we have an opportunity to change things.

 

According to the Organic Consumers Association‘s latest article, our Secretary of State has announced the ‘Right to Know’ initiative and what that means is GENETICALLY MOTIFIED FOOD (GMO), the stuff that your system just can’t process, (if passed) will now be ‘known’ to you, and this will be on the November Ballot. Some of us, I like to think most of us are reading labels, and really want to know what we are eating. Way cool! High fives all around!

 

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