New Study Confirms Chocolate's Fat-Busting Properties

New Study Confirms Chocolate's Fat-Busting Properties

One of my favorite past times is not only eating chocolate, but reporting on it.

Recently, for instance, I reported on a myth-busting study finding chocolate burns belly fat, as well as improves cholesterol.[i] Before that I reported on research indicating that the medicinal properties of chocolate are so powerful that this treat gives the 29 billion dollar statin drug industry a run for its money as far as protecting you from the #1 cause of death in the Western world.

No doubt, chocolate lovers are reveling in the fact that their love affair with this irresistible treat is increasingly being officially sanctified by today's lab coat wearing priestly caste. After all, many folks suffer from a love/hate relationship with chocolate; ambivalent over their habitual consumption of something still generally considered to be 'candy,' and indeed is still placed in the candy aisle of institutions such as grocery stores and pharmacies. 

Now, a new observational study published in the journal Nutrition, confirms that chocolate consumption may have significant health benefits. The European study titled, "Association between chocolate consumption and fatness in European adolescents," found a higher chocolate consumption was associated with lower total and central fatness in European adolescents.

The study method was reported as follows:

"This study comprised 1458 adolescents (ages 12.5-17.5 y) participating in HELENA-CSS (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-Sectional Study). Dietary intake was self-registered using a computer-based tool for 24-h dietary recall on 2 non-consecutive days. Weight and height were measured, and BMI [body mass index] was calculated. Adiposity was estimated using skinfolds (Slaughter's equation) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Waist circumference was measured. Sexual maturation also was recorded. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry."

The results were summarized as follows:

"Higher chocolate consumption was associated with lower levels of total and central fatness, as estimated by BMI, body fat estimated from skinfolds and BIA, and waist circumference, regardless of potential confounders (P ≤ 0.01)."

The researchers took into account and made methodological adjustments to exclude the following confounding factors:

  • Age
  • Sex
  • Sexual maturation
  • Total energy intake
  • Saturated fat intake
  • Fruit and vegetable intake
  • Physical activity level
  • Tea and coffee consumption

And finally, they repeated the analysis excluding obese and overweight adolescents "Due to the general assumption that individuals with higher levels of adiposity are more likely to underreport dietary intake," but the results did not change.   

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Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

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Chocolate's Fat-Busting Properties



Does it matter whether the chocolate is sweetened with sugar or not?

Great Chocolate



Check out Endangered Species Chocolate. It comes in 72% and 88% pure 3.5 oz. bags that contain 10 squares. A serving is four squares but I find one is plenty.

It is organic. It is Fair Trade. Best of all, every time you purchase a bar, you raise support for species and habitats worldwide. Each year, Endangered Species Chocolate donates 10% of net profits to environmental non-profits that are focused on wildlife conservation and habitat preservation.

No, I do not work for them. However, I keep their chocolate in my house and incorporate it in my diet as part of my alternative health plan for managing PTSD and depression. I have been medication free for 3 1/2 years after 18 years on Prozac.

Yes!



I loved seeing this:

"If it is not organically produced, fair-trade and as dark and unprocessed (raw is best) as is feasible, it won't be as good for you physically or spiritually."

I have found that it is important to be specific when I tell people the benefits of chocolate. I told one woman how it alleviates depression. She came back to me later and said "I ate chocolate last night and it didn't feel better."  I asked what she ate. Half a bag of Oreos. :: head/desk ::  

This was eye-opening:

"Due to the general assumption that individuals with higher levels of adiposity are more likely to underreport dietary intake," but the results did not change.   

Translation: fat people lie. As a formerly fat person, I got really tired of doctors assuming that I lie about everything. 

Maybe if doctor's would stop food shaming fat people and understand what drives people to over-eat instead of judging them for it, they would not have to worry about fat people lying.

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