Water, Energy, and the Perils of Dehydration

 Water, Energy, and the Perils of Dehydration

What if water, plain and simple, was the most critically lacking substance for energy and health promotion in the modern lifestyle? 

Some years ago, I read the late Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj's marvelous book, Your Body's Many Cries for Water, first published in 1992 and more recently updated in 2008.  Here this Iranian-American physician made and makes a strong case that chronic low grade and usually unrecognized dehydration affects most of us in the West, attuned as we are to avoiding water as a beverage and too often choosing dehydrating caffeinated and sweetened drinks that only contribute to the problem.  After all, caffeine is a well-known diuretic, as is sugar.  We may think when we imbibe sodas, coffee, energy drinks, or for the healthier among us, even herbal teas, that we are in effect ingesting adequate "water." But as Dr. Batmanghelidj points out, such intake only makes dehydration worse, causing a greater water loss overall than we take in.  For example, for every 10 ounces of a caffeinated beverage, be it coffee, black tea, soda pop or an "energy" drink, we can lose up to 12 ounces of water, a loss contributing to, not resolving, low grade chronic dehydration.  Even the healthy favorites of non-caffeinated herbal teas dehydrate, due to the complex combination of diuretic molecules in the brew as well as the osmotic effect.

 

 

After reading this book and the several that followed, I began to suspect that many of my patients, often diagnosed with life threatening malignancies and other serious degenerative diseases, appeared to be chronically dehydrated, though virtually none expressed any sensation of thirst.  Many, when first starting treatment with me, acknowledged that they never drank any water at all, relying instead, and mistakenly, on a variety of other beverages including dehydrating herbal teas they assumed provided for all water needs.  For many years I have routinely recommended my patients drink a minimum of 6-8 glasses of water a day in addition to whatever other liquids they might ingest such as the recommended vegetable juices.  More recently, after giving greater thought to the subject, I have been recommending now 8-10 glasses a day, along with one half teaspoon of good quality sea salt, such as Himalayan or Celtic Sea Salt.  And, I have been surprised by the unexpected results.  

Recently, one patient's cholesterol, despite intensive nutritional supplementation including those anti-cholesterol nutrients such as carnitine, etc. a proper organic diet and intensive detoxification routines, continued to rise toward the 300 level.  When I questioned him, he readily admitted that though I had suggested he consume 6-8 glasses of water daily, he assumed that the four glasses of prescribed carrot juice and a remarkable eight cups of organic herbal tea would serve as equivalents to drinking plain water, which he found tedious to do and distasteful.  When I instructed him that he immediately eliminate all herbal tea from his diet substituting instead the recommended water, within six weeks his total cholesterol dropped 63 points and his HDL, the alleged "good" cholesterol, went up considerably.  Water intake had done effectively in six weeks what many heart-friendly supplements and an ideal nutritionally replete diet had failed to do in a year.

Water Delicious

Dr. Batmanghelidj provides an interesting explanation for such cholesterol drops, as I have now observed in my own practice.  Water certainly serves many functions in our body, as a solvent in the blood, as well as "filler" in the extra and intracellular spaces, but it also functions as a main adhesive in cell membranes, keeping them intact while yet fluid, allowing the necessary passage of molecules in and out of the cell.  As a polar molecule, water's electrically charged surfaces keep the complex molecules that make up the membrane itself in place, where they are supposed to be.  In a state of deficiency as the water level in the membranes falls, the movement of nutrients into the cells and wastes out becomes significantly less efficient, and the membrane structure itself becomes less stable.  In this situation, if chronic, the liver begins synthesizing and releasing cholesterol into the bloodstream; this lipid can then substitute for water as a last ditch adhesive in the cells, to keep their membranes functional.  So, an elevated cholesterol in the context of undiagnosed chronic water deficiency reflects the body's wisdom, rather than some random or genetic mystery.  

Dr. Batmanghelidj also makes a case that diabetes may be another result of chronic subclinical water deficiency. To understand his argument, as a start I think it would be useful to summarize, though briefly, what insulin does.  This hormone, through a complex receptor system and signal transduction in the target cells, drives glucose across membranes so it can be used by cells as an energy source.  Along with the glucose, other substances including potassium, certain amino acids, and importantly, water pass into the cell interior.  As Dr. Batmanghelidj points out, this insulin-stimulated flow of water from the extracellular to the intracellular space can be a problem with even mild dehydration, leading as it can to further depletion of the body's extracellular fluids and reduced blood volume.  Since neurons are 85% water in their healthy state and since the brain receives and requires fully 20% of our total blood supply, carrying with it oxygen and essential nutrients, the effect of vascular volume depletion can be catastrophic.  Dr. Batmanghelidj argues that to preserve its own blood supply and the integrity of its nine trillion cells, the brain, through prostaglandin and neurologic signaling, suppresses insulin synthesis and secretion.  This in turn reduces the constant flow of water into the various cells of the body, conserving water to satisfy the brain's own requirements.  Of course there's a tradeoff, reduced fluid supplies to most cells in order to meet the water demands of the central nervous system.

Dehydrated Man

To complicate matters, deficiency in salt (sodium chloride), an essential nutrient, often accompanies and complicates subclinical as well as overt dehydration.  This is particularly true in our current medical climate, in which physicians generally ignore the importance of adequate water intake at the same time demonizing salt, ignoring the mineral's many essential biochemical functions.  Among its many responsibilities, sodium chloride is an essential component of the extracellular fluids, helping to maintain its normal osmotic state.  In salt deficiency, the extracellular "sea" becomes dilute to the point water will flow into the area of higher density within the cell, contributing to the further depletion of extracellular fluids.  But as the pancreatic beta cells reduce insulin secretion and blood glucose levels rise in response to dehydration, glucose can substitute for sodium in the extracellular space, maintaining normal osmotic balance while reducing the potentially dangerous excessive flow of water into the cells.  In this vision, diabetes serves as an appropriate response to a difficult situation, chronic dehydration, reorganizing basic physiological processes as the disease we call diabetes in order to preserve our brain health. 

Batmanghelidg

Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj 

In his writings, Dr. Batmanghelidj perceives diabetes as a problem primarily of insulin suppression, which helps compensates for significant water and salt deficiency.  We, however, in our office, see the situation a bit differently, and with greater complexity.

As to some background, my colleague Dr. Linda Isaacs and I offer a very intensive nutrition program for the treatment of cancer and other serious illness, involving three basic components: individualized diets, individualized supplement regimens, and "detoxification" routines such as the coffee enemas.  The diets we prescribe can range from largely plant based, raw foods (always organic of course) to an Atkins-type largely fatty red meat plan (all grass fed). We base our specific dietary and supplement recommendations on the state of the each patient's Autonomic Nervous System (ANS), that collection of neurons that regulate virtually all physiological processes including respiration, cardiovascular activity, digestion, endocrine secretion, and immune function.  Neurophysiologists further divide the Autonomic Nervous System into two branches, the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) and the Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) which work in opposition to each other but synergistically to regulate metabolism from moment to moment, as our activities, needs, and stresses change.  For example, keeping the discussion brief, when the sympathetic system fires, heart rate and blood pressure increase, and blood shunts from the digestive organs and skin to the brain.  When the parasympathetic neurons fire, an opposite series of events follows, with blood flowing more readily to the digestive system and skin, and less so to the brain.  Of course, in classical physiology the SNS represents the stress nervous system which mobilizes the body's resources to deal with any minor or major difficulty in our lives, sending blood to the brain so we can think fast and to our muscles so we can react quickly as needed, while shutting down non-essential – at least in the stressful moment – processes like digestion. In contrast, the PNS acts more as the system of repair, rebuilding, and regeneration, responsible for the breakdown of food, the absorption, assimilation, and utilization of nutrients.

Para.Symp

We believe certain patients have a strong sympathetic system, and a corresponding weak parasympathetic system.  This has relevance to our discussion, since when the sympathetic system fires, its active nerves suppress pancreatic insulin secretion while at the same time stimulating the breakdown of body proteins and storage carbohydrates into simple glucose, hence ultimately raising blood sugar.

In such patients with a strong SNS, the brain, perceiving chronic even low grade dehydration as a significant danger and physiologic stress, further activates the already hypertonic SNS, suppressing insulin release still more and encouraging glucose production.  If prolonged without resolution of the underlying dehydration, the scenario outlined by Dr. Batmanghelidj ensues, with the brain trying to maintain extracellular and essential blood volume by reducing insulin secretion and increasing the osmotic effect of glucose in the extracellular fluids.  In such patients, we prescribe a diet and supplement regiment aimed at reducing sympathetic tone, at the same time increasing PNS activity.  But if we don't also correct dehydration with adequate water intake, the SNS will keep firing, determined to keep blood flow to the brain intact.

In another group of patients we find a strong parasympathetic nervous system, and a correspondingly weak sympathetic system, and in them diabetes has a different origin, and a different course.  In contrast to the SNS, when the PNS nerves activate they directly stimulate the pancreatic beta cells to synthesize and release copious amounts of insulin into the bloodstream.  Consequently, these patients, even when healthy, tend toward high blood insulin and a lower than "normal" blood sugar, since glucose will be shunted out of the blood and into the cells rather continuously.   

With dehydration, even low grade, chronic dehydration these "Parasympathetic Dominants" as we call them, must also work to conserve extracellular fluid volume.  However, over time though they continue to secrete excess insulin, in response the receptors for the hormone situated on target cells withdraw from the membrane, neutralizing its glucose-driving effect no matter how high the insulin level goes. We end up with the paradoxical situation of high blood insulin, coupled with high blood sugar – what contemporary researchers refer to as "insulin resistance," a syndrome I associate primarily if not exclusively with an overly strong parasympathetic system.  But the end result, in a state of dehydration, is the same as insulin suppression in the "Sympathetic Dominants", less water seeping into cells and higher extracellular glucose acting as an osmotic pull to keep water where it is most needed in the bloodstream.  With these patients we prescribe a diet and supplement regimen designed to suppress the overactive PNS and stimulate the weaker SNS.  But in addition to appropriate diet and supplement programs, adequate water and with it salt are a must.

water

Though I found the clinical results of increasing water impressive, I became intrigued by my patients reporting significant improvement in their overall energy as well as their cognition, often within days of upping their water while at the same time reducing ingestion of dehydrating liquids like tea.  I began to suspect a fair amount of fatigue – both severe in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and less so in the typical malaise reported by so many in this day and age – has, as a significant component, chronic low-grade dehydration.

My clinical observations led me to an intensive review of the literature on cellular energetics, both academic and more popular, including the books of Dr. Batmanghelidj, many of them well-referenced.  I began to suspect that everything I had been taught about the subject of water in my highly "sophisticated" biochemistry courses in medical school may have been very much misguided.  Of course, it has been long dogma, for at least 50 years that our cells synthesize the energy they need from the breakdown of food stuffs, including complex carbohydrates, proteins, and fatty acids into glucose, a six carbon sugar.  Ultimately, or so the teaching goes, each molecule of glucose provided either directly from diet or indirectly from the conversion of certain amino acids and fatty acid break down products, gets channeled into glycolysis, a series of ten complex reactions occurring within the cell cytoplasm.  This sequence of molecular events ultimately reduces glucose to the two carbon molecule pyruvate.  In the process, two molecules of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the cell's main storage molecule for potential energy, form.  In ATP, potential energy resides in what are called "high energy phosphate" chemical bonds, where it is held in reserve until released.   I might add that biochemists consider a two molecule production of ATP trivial for all the complicated enzymatic efforts involved in these initial steps of glucose metabolism.  

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Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

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Energy



Good to have another angle on the molecular minestrone of energy production.  Since I live on coffee, green sun tea and lotsa fruit/plant water along with seasalts, I tend to disagree with parts of that approach and more strongly consider charge terrain, pH and the H2O/H3O2 matrix. 

I find oxygen delivery to be the bottleneck in energy production which enters a downward spiral into oxidative stress and all disease when acidity builds and O2 is further refused. Metabolism generates water, and also occurs as fermentation in the cytoplasm...yet it is charge separation and water structure that holds more oxygen and builds potential, powers circulation and membrane transport.

A major problem is the ingestion of too many easily absorbed processed food molecules and the inability to deliver oxygen sufficient to offset the resultant acidity from metabolizing  and processing the overload...Another is insufficient intake of antioxidants.  Metals kill charge, stress kills charge, bad/oxidized membrane fats, mineral/electrolyte imbalances fail to produce charge and organic toxins disrupt organ function and biochemistry in general.

Since the understanding of matter and energy stand at the door to the secret of life, the synthesis of chemistry, physics and cell biology should be the focus of further investigation and clarification...and like Dr. Gonzalez shows, there's stuff we don't even know we don't know.

 

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/its-always-oxygenreally

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