Health Guide: Food-Brain Connection

Health Guides: Food-Brain Connection

This section collates research and information on the brain-food connection. It is designed to provide our users with the first-hand scientific research on the topic, as well as in-depth analysis of the implications of this research.

Key: CK(#) = Cumulative Knowledge, a measure of evidence quality or strength  AC(#) = Article Count, the number of articles that have accumulated on the topic thus far.

Latest Relevant Article

Pubmed Data : Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Feb ;101(2):262-9. Epub 2014 Dec 10. PMID: 25646322
Study Type : Human Study

Related Articles

Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Food addictions are not strictly “psychological” problems, but have a hard-wired, organic component. Many of the most commonly consumed foods in Western culture actually contain narcotic properties associated with the presence of psychoactive chemicals that bind to opioid receptors in the nervous system.
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Wheat could be driving more than your digestive system crazy. While wheat is well known to wreak havoc on the gastrointestinal health of genetically susceptible folks, such as those with celiac disease, and more recently, irritable bowel syndrome, new research published in the journal Psychiatry Research indicates that sensitivity to one of the components in wheat known as gliadin could be driving some into states of acute mania.
Are grains toxic for everyone? Is gluten-free enough to protect your health?
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
In the first study of its kind researchers have linked trans fatty acid consumption to increased aggression in humans. Published in the Public Library of Science’s own journal, PLoS, March 5th 2012, researchers at the Dept. of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, reported: "This study provides the first evidence linking dTFA [dietary trans fatty acids] with behavioral irritability and aggression."
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Could fructose be as addictive as alcohol, a socially sanctioned drug that millions are addicted to around the world?
Apples of course have a reputation for keeping the doctor away and now science finds that both apples and pears may keep strokes away. In the first study of the color of produce, Dutch researchers found that the white flesh of fruits and vegetables may protect against stroke. Other colors, not so much.
Written by Dr. David Hartz, DC
Not many people realize they have two brains. Yes, you read that right. And your second brain may have more to do with your health that you ever imagined.
Written by Eleni Roumeliotou
Accumulating science reveals we should worry about the impact of trans-fats on the brain of unborn children and the next generation in general.
Written by Deanna Minich, PhD
As it turns out, flavonoids seem to work mechanistically similar to anti-anxiety drugs: they are able to pass the blood-brain barrier, but without the side effects of medications.
The symptoms of depression are often treated with drugs that can have long-term adverse side effects. A new study finds chlorella significantly reduces symptoms of major depression.

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