Health Guide: Wheat and Gluten Research

Health Guides: Wheat and Gluten Research

Despite popular opinion wheat consumption may not be beneficial to health. These two published articles make a strong argument against perceiving wheat intolerance as simply a matter of allergy/genetic intolerance in a minority subset of the human population, but rather as a species-specific intolerance, applicable to all.

Part 1: The Dark Side of Wheat: New Perspectives on Celiac Disease & Wheat Intolerance

Part 2: Opening Pandora’s Bread Box: The Critical Role of Wheat Lectin in Human Disease.

Key: CK(#) = Cumulative Knowledge, a measure of evidence quality or strength  AC(#) = Article Count, the number of articles that have accumulated on the topic thus far.

Latest Relevant Article

Article Publish Status : This is a free article. Click here to read the complete article.
Pubmed Data : BMC Gastroenterol. 2013 ;13(1):157. Epub 2013 Nov 9. PMID: 24209578
Study Type : Human Study

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