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Cholesterol

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View the Evidence: Substances

Pubmed Data : Ann Intern Med. 1998 Mar 15 ;128(6):478-87. PMID: 9499332
Study Type : Meta Analysis

Pubmed Data : Neuropsychobiology. 1983 ;10(2-3):65-9. PMID: 6674827
Study Type : Human Study

Pubmed Data : Psychiatr Serv. 1998 Feb ;49(2):221-4. PMID: 9575009
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links

Pubmed Data : J Psychiatr Res. 2000 Jul-Oct;34(4-5):301-9. PMID: 11104842
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links

Pubmed Data : Eur Psychiatry. 2003 Feb ;18(1):23-7. PMID: 12648892
Study Type : Human Study

Pubmed Data : Psychiatry Res. 2008 Feb 28 ;158(1):87-91. Epub 2007 Dec 26. PMID: 18155776
Study Type : Human Study

Pubmed Data : J Behav Med. 1995 Feb ;18(1):33-43. PMID: 7595950
Study Type : Human Study

Pubmed Data : Psychol Rep. 1994 Apr ;74(2):622. PMID: 8197299
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links

Pubmed Data : Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2007 Apr;10(2):159-66. Epub 2006 May 17. PMID: 16707033
Study Type : Human Study



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