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Abstract Title:

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation acts as antioxidant on dystrophic muscle cells.

Abstract Source:

Cell Stress Chaperones. 2019 Oct 16. Epub 2019 Oct 16. PMID: 31620981

Abstract Author(s):

Daniela Sayuri Mizobuti, Aline Reis Fogaça, Fernanda Dos Santos Rapucci Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci Moraes, Rafael Dias Mâncio, Túlio de Almeida Hermes, Aline Barbosa Macedo, Amanda Harduim Valduga, Caroline Caramano de Lourenço, Elaine Cristina Leite Pereira, Elaine Minatel

Article Affiliation:

Daniela Sayuri Mizobuti

Abstract:

Increased oxidative stress is a frequent feature in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). High reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, associated with altered enzyme antioxidant activity, have been reported in dystrophic patients and mdx mice, an experimental model of DMD. In this study, we investigated the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on oxidative stress marker levels and calcium concentration in primary cultures of dystrophic muscle cells from mdx mice. Primary cultures of skeletal muscle cells from C57BL/10 and mdx mice were treated with coenzyme Q10 (5μM) for 24 h. The untreated mdx and C57BL/10 muscle cells were used as controls. The MTT and live/dead cell assays showed that CoQ10 presented no cytotoxic effect on normal and dystrophic muscle cells. Intracellular calcium concentration, HOproduction, 4-HNE, and SOD-2 levels were higher in mdx muscle cells. No significant difference in the catalase, GPx, and Gr levels was found between experimental groups. This study demonstrated that CoQ10 treatment was able to reduce levels of oxidative stress markers, such as HO, acting as an antioxidant, as well as decreasing abnormal intracellular calcium influx in dystrophic muscles cells. This study demonstrated that CoQ10 treatment was able to reduce levels of oxidative stress markers, such as HO, acting as an antioxidant, as well as decreasing abnormal intracellular calcium influx in dystrophic muscles cells. Our findings also suggest that the decrease of oxidative stress reduces the need for upregulation of antioxidant pathways, such as SOD and GSH.

Study Type : In Vitro Study

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