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Abstract Title:

Whole Egg Consumption in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats Display a Dose-dependent Reduction in Weight Gain and Total Body Fat, Accompanied by an Increase in Lean Body Mass (P21-054-19).

Abstract Source:

Curr Dev Nutr. 2019 Jun ;3(Suppl 1). Epub 2019 Jun 13. PMID: 31225265

Abstract Author(s):

Joe Webb, Cassondra Saande, Kevin Schalinske, Matthew Rowling

Article Affiliation:

Joe Webb

Abstract:

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the lowest dose of whole egg-based diets to effectively attenuate the obese phenotype in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats using a dose-response experimental design.

Methods: Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (= 8) and their lean controls (= 8) were obtained at 6 weeks of age. Following one week of acclimation, animals were randomly assigned to one of 5 treatment groups: a casein-based diet (20% protein, w/w) or a whole-egg based diet provided at either 20, 10, 5, or 2.5% egg protein (w/w). Animals were fed their respective diets for8 weeks with weight gain and food intake measured daily. At 14 weeks of age, body composition was analyzed by dual X-ray absorptiometry and statistical differences were measured between groups using a 2-way ANOVA at < 0.05.

Results: Whole egg-based diets exerted a dose-dependent decrease in cumulative body weight gain and final body weight; increased in food intake; decreased total body fat; and increased lean body mass. Interestingly, the 20% whole egg protein diet decreased body fat and increased lean body mass in the ZDF rats and their lean controls.

Conclusions: Together, these data support the hypothesis that dietary consumption of whole eggs may decrease weight gain, reduce body fat, and increase lean body mass in a dose-dependent manner in ZDF rats. These results suggest the need to modify dietary recommendations during T2D and obesity to potentially consume more whole egg.

Funding Sources: This work was supported by the Egg Nutrition Center and in part by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Supporting Tables Images and/or Graphs:

Study Type : Animal Study

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