Abstract Title:

Consumption of Fructose and High Fructose Corn Syrup Increase Postprandial Triglycerides, LDL-Cholesterol, and Apolipoprotein-B in Young Men and Women.

Abstract Source:

J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Aug 17. Epub 2011 Aug 17. PMID: 21849529

Abstract Author(s):

Kimber L Stanhope, Andrew A Bremer, Valentina Medici, Katsuyuki Nakajima, Yasuki Ito, Takamitsu Nakano, Guoxia Chen, Tak Hou Fong, Vivien Lee, Roseanne I Menorca, Nancy L Keim, Peter J Havel

Article Affiliation:

Department of Molecular Biosciences (K.L.S., G.C., T.H.F., V.L., R.I.M., P.J.H.), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Nutrition (K.L.S., P.J.H., N.L.K.), Department of Pediatrics (A.A.B.), Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (V.M.), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, and United States Department of Agriculture (N.L.K.),

Abstract:

Context: The American Heart Association Nutrition Committee recommends women and men consume no more than 100 and 150 kcal of added sugar per day, respectively, whereas the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, suggests a maximal added sugar intake of 25% or less of total energy. Objective: To address this discrepancy, we compared the effects of consuming glucose, fructose, or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) at 25% of energy requirements (E) on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Participants, Design and Setting, and Intervention: Forty-eight adults (aged 18-40 yr; body mass index 18-35 kg/m(2)) resided at the Clinical Research Center for 3.5 d of baseline testing while consuming energy-balanced diets containing 55% E complex carbohydrate. For 12 outpatient days, they consumed usual ad libitum diets along with three servings per day of glucose, fructose, or HFCS-sweetened beverages (n = 16/group), which provided 25% E requirements. Subjects then consumed energy-balanced diets containing 25% E sugar-sweetened beverages/30% E complex carbohydrate during 3.5 d of inpatient intervention testing. Main Outcome Measures: Twenty-four-hour triglyceride area under the curve, fasting plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations were measured. Results: Twenty-four-hour triglyceride area under the curve was increased compared with baseline during consumption of fructose (+4.7± 1.2 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.0032) and HFCS (+1.8 ± 1.4 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.035) but not glucose (-1.9 ± 0.9 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.14). Fasting LDL and apoB concentrations were increased during consumption of fructose (LDL: +0.29 ± 0.082 mmol/liter, P = 0.0023; apoB: +0.093 ± 0.022g/liter, P = 0.0005) and HFCS (LDL: +0.42 ± 0.11 mmol/liter, P<0.0001; apoB: +0.12± 0.031 g/liter, P<0.0001) but not glucose (LDL: +0.012± 0.071 mmol/liter, P = 0.86; apoB: +0.0097 ± 0.019 g/liter, P = 0.90). Conclusions: Consumption of HFCS-sweetened beverages for 2 wk at 25% E increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease comparably with fructose and more than glucose in young adults.

Print Options


Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2020 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.