Abstract Title:

The effect of raising or lowering tryptophan levels on aggression in vervet monkeys.

Abstract Source:

Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1987 Dec;28(4):503-10. PMID: 3432316

Abstract Author(s):

B Chamberlain, F R Ervin, R O Pihl, S N Young

Article Affiliation:

Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract:

Social groups of vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) were given amino acid mixtures that were tryptophan-free (T-), nutritionally balanced (B), or contained excess tryptophan (T+). The T- mixture caused a marked decrease in plasma tryptophan and the T+ mixture a large increase. Behavioral observations were made on the animals after administration of the amino acid mixtures both during spontaneous activity and while the (fasted) animals were competing for food newly placed in the feeder. The only effect of the biochemical manipulations on spontaneous aggression was an increase in aggression of the male animals with the T- mixture. During competition for the food the T- mixture increased and the T+ mixture decreased aggression in the males, while the T+ mixture decreased aggression in females. These data indicate that brain 5-hydroxytryptamine can influence aggression in a primate and suggest that altered tryptophan levels can influence aggression more reliably at higher levels of arousal.

Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2021 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.