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Abstract Title:

Probiotic Ingestion, Obesity, and Metabolic-Related Disorders: Results from NHANES, 1999-2014.

Abstract Source:

Nutrients. 2019 Jun 28 ;11(7). Epub 2019 Jun 28. PMID: 31261830

Abstract Author(s):

Eva Lau, João Sérgio Neves, Manuel Ferreira-Magalhães, Davide Carvalho, Paula Freitas

Article Affiliation:

Eva Lau

Abstract:

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been recognized as having key importance in obesity- and metabolic-related diseases. Although there is increasing evidence of the potential benefits induced by probiotics in metabolic disturbances, there is a lack of large cross-sectional studies to assess population-based prevalence of probiotic intake and metabolic diseases. Our aim was to evaluate the association of probiotic ingestion with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. A cross-sectional study was designed using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2014. Probiotic ingestion was considered when a subject reported consumption of yogurt or a probiotic supplement during the 24-hour dietary recall or during the Dietary Supplement Use 30-Day questionnaire. We included 38,802 adults and 13.1% reported probiotic ingestion. The prevalence of obesity and hypertension was lower in the probiotic group (obesity-adjusted Odds Ratio (OR): 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.92,<0.001; hypertension-adjusted OR: 0.79, 95% CI 0.71-0.88,<0.001). Accordingly, even after analytic adjustments, body mass index (BMI) was significantly lower in the probiotic group, as were systolic and diastolic blood pressure and triglycerides; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was significantly higher in the probiotic group for the adjusted model. In this large-scale study, ingestion of probiotic supplements or yogurt was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity and hypertension.

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