Abstract Title:

Japanese-style acupuncture for endometriosis-related pelvic pain in adolescents and young women: results of a randomized sham-controlled trial.

Abstract Source:

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2008 Oct;21(5):247-57. PMID: 18794019

Abstract Author(s):

Peter M Wayne, Catherine E Kerr, Rosa N Schnyer, Anna T R Legedza, Jacqueline Savetsky-German, Monica H Shields, Julie E Buring, Roger B Davis, Lisa A Conboy, Ellen Highfield, Barbara Parton, Phaedra Thomas, Marc R Laufer

Article Affiliation:

Harvard Medical School, Osher Research Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. peter_wayne@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract:

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess feasibility, and collect preliminary data for a subsequent randomized, sham-controlled trial to evaluate Japanese-style acupuncture for reducing chronic pelvic pain and improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents with endometriosis.

DESIGN: Randomized, sham-controlled trial.

SETTINGS: Tertiary-referral hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen young women (13-22y) with laparoscopically-diagnosed endometriosis-related chronic pelvic pain.

INTERVENTIONS: A Japanese style of acupuncture and a sham acupuncture control. Sixteen treatments were administered over 8 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Protocol feasibility, recruitment numbers, pain not associated with menses or intercourse, and multiple HRQOL instruments including Endometriosis Health Profile, Pediatric Quality of Life, Perceived Stress, and Activity Limitation.

RESULTS: Fourteen participants (out of 18 randomized) completed the study per protocol. Participants in the active acupuncture group (n = 9) experienced an average 4.8 (SD = 2.4) point reduction on a 11 point scale (62%) in pain after 4 weeks, which differed significantly from the control group's (n = 5) average reduction of 1.4 (SD = 2.1) points (P = 0.004). Reduction in pain in the active group persisted through a 6-month assessment; however, after 4 weeks, differences between the active and control group decreased and were not statistically significant. All HRQOL measures indicated greater improvements in the active acupuncture group compared to the control; however, the majority of these trends were not statistically significant. No serious adverse events were reported.

CONCLUSION: Preliminary estimates indicate that Japanese-style acupuncture may be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated adjunct therapy for endometriosis-related pelvic pain in adolescents. A more definitive trial evaluating Japanese-style acupuncture in this population is both feasible and warranted.

Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Therapeutic Actions : Acupuncture : CK(2697) : AC(307)

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2020 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.