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Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Psilocybin induces rapid and persistent growth of dendritic spines in frontal cortex in vivo.

Abstract Source:

Neuron. 2021 Jun 25. Epub 2021 Jun 25. PMID: 34228959

Abstract Author(s):

Ling-Xiao Shao, Clara Liao, Ian Gregg, Pasha A Davoudian, Neil K Savalia, Kristina Delagarza, Alex C Kwan

Article Affiliation:

Ling-Xiao Shao

Abstract:

Psilocybin is a serotonergic psychedelic with untapped therapeutic potential. There are hints that the use of psychedelics can produce neural adaptations, although the extent and timescale of the impact in a mammalian brain are unknown. In this study, we used chronic two-photon microscopy to image longitudinally the apical dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the mouse medial frontal cortex. We found that a single dose of psilocybin led to∼10% increases in spine size and density, driven by an elevated spine formation rate. The structural remodeling occurred quickly within 24 h and was persistent 1 month later. Psilocybin also ameliorated stress-related behavioral deficit and elevated excitatory neurotransmission. Overall, the results demonstrate that psilocybin-evoked synaptic rewiring in the cortex is fast and enduring, potentially providing a structural trace for long-term integration of experiences and lasting beneficial actions.

Study Type : Animal Study
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