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Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Gut Microbiota Composition Before and After Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors.

Abstract Source:

Dig Dis Sci. 2018 11 ;63(11):2940-2949. Epub 2018 May 24. PMID: 29796911

Abstract Author(s):

Mariko Hojo, Takashi Asahara, Akihito Nagahara, Tsutomu Takeda, Kohei Matsumoto, Hiroya Ueyama, Kenshi Matsumoto, Daisuke Asaoka, Takuya Takahashi, Koji Nomoto, Yuichiro Yamashiro, Sumio Watanabe

Article Affiliation:

Mariko Hojo

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Recently, problems associated with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use have begun to surface. PPIs influence the gut microbiota; therefore, PPI use may increase the risk of enteric infections and cause bacterial translocation. In this study, we investigated fecal microbiota composition, fecal organic acid concentrations and pH, and gut bacteria in the blood of the same patients before and after PPI use.

METHODS: Twenty patients with reflux esophagitis based on endoscopic examination received 8 weeks of treatment with PPIs. To analyze fecal microbiota composition and gut bacteria in blood and organic acid concentrations, 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted quantitative RT-PCR and high-performance liquid chromatography were conducted.

RESULTS: Lactobacillus species were significantly increased at both 4 and 8 weeks after PPI treatment compared with bacterial counts before treatment (P = 0.011 and P = 0.002, respectively). Among Lactobacillus spp., counts of the L. gasseri subgroup, L. fermentum, the L. reuteri subgroup, and the L. ruminis subgroup were significantly increased at 4 and 8 weeksafter treatment compared with counts before treatment. Streptococcus species were also significantly increased at 4 and 8 weeks after PPI treatment compared with counts before treatment (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the total organic acid concentrations before and after PPI treatment. Detection rates of bacteria in blood before and after PPI treatment were 22 and 28%, respectively, with no significant differences.

CONCLUSIONS: Our quantitative RT-PCR results showed that gut dysbiosis was caused by PPI use, corroborating previous results obtained by metagenomic analysis.

Study Type : Human Study
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